Long Beach Symphony Set-Up

Long Beach Symphony Set-Up

From the Ground Up: Building a Long Beach Symphony POPS! Concert. Long Beach Symphony POPS! concerts are fantastic orchestra dinner picnics featuring 300 dinner tables of 10. Groups are encouraged to bring picnics and favorite libations or to arrange for catering at their tables before and during the performance. This is unlike any other concert that I play and I make a cameo in this video 2:34....
Percussion Paints Pictures

Percussion Paints Pictures

Over the past 17 years, I have been a member of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra Percussion Ensemble. During this time, we have performed over 400 shows for the 2nd and 3rd graders in the Long Beach Unified School District. The LBSO commissioned Lynda Sue Marks  to write the show entitled Percussion Paints Pictures. The current ensemble is Lynda Sue Marks and Gary Long (percussion) with Jamieson Price. This show is one of the highlights of my year. Watching the 2nd and 3rd grade kids reaction to the music is priceless and I can’t wait for my kids to see the show...
Snare Drum Warm-Up Part 2

Snare Drum Warm-Up Part 2

In September, I shared my updated snare drum warm-up. It was my hope to start the conversation about creating a unified warm-up that hit all the basic building blocks on snare drum in a 10-15 minutes. I would love to hear if anyone has been using it and if it has worked. I found over the past 6 months, that it has helped me focus and prepare for my practice session along with getting me warm. I also feel that while I enjoy using the warm-up I needed a metronome to keep me honest and continue to push me. So, I decided to program my metronome with the different lines so I could be more effective in my execution of the warm-up. (I have written before about my favorite metronome app for the iPhone. Tempo Advanced is a killer app and is the best $2 you will ever spend. It is now available on iPhone and Android and has recently been updated to include polyrhythms. More about that in a future article). I programmed each line of the warm-up into Tempo Advanced and created a set list that progresses through the entire sheet. I wanted to figure out a way to share this everyone and it wasn’t until last night (when I found Reflector) that I was able to record my iPad screen. I uploaded the video to YouTube and now anyone can use this video to practice with the sheet music. In the future, I would like to program it at different tempos. Before I do that, I would like some feedback from you. Let me know what you think. Does it work for you? Is there anything I should change? Have a great weekend and happy practicing. —————————- Originally posted on DrumChattr.com on February 21,...
Long Beach Symphony Kids Concerts

Long Beach Symphony Kids Concerts

On January 22 and 23, 2014, I was fortunate to perform the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra’s Symphony Concerts for Young People at the Terrace Theater. The program, entitled “An English Exhibition,” included: Star Spangled Banner, Trumpet Voluntary, Pomp and Circumstance No. 1, Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra, Mars (from “The Planets.”). I am always grateful to play with the LBSO and I especially enjoy playing for all of the 5th Graders from the Long Beach Unified School District. Thanks Lynda Sue Marks and the staff of the LBSO for everything you...
How Effectively Do You Use YouTube?

How Effectively Do You Use YouTube?

We all know that YouTube is a valuable source for any musician. According to YouTube’s statistics, 72 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute. We all know that there are a lot of bad videos included in this number, but there are also many videos that are educational and worth watching. So how do you use YouTube? Chris Robley wrote a blog post on the D.I.Y. Musician Blog (a service brought to us by CD Baby) detailing the “Top 5 Tips for Effective Music Video Promotion on YouTube.” Some of the top tips included: 1. Add links at the top of the description field for each video This is very important since you only get about three lines of text before the you have to click the “Show More” tab on the window (see below). Unless someone is really interested in the video, they are not going to click the tab to see more information. You need to grab their attention immediately, which leads to #2. 2. Make the first 15 seconds count How many times have you gone to YouTube to watch a video and clicked away because you did like the beginning of the video? I am guilty of clicking away from a video if it does not immediately capture my attention. Here are some other things to think about relating to this topic: I would also suggest not doing a pre-roll (similar to going to see a movie). In my opinion, no one cares about the title, director, etc. at the beginning of the video. Go right to the action and put all of that in the comments (below the “show more” tab). Or, use a strip at the bottom of the video if you need the information to be seen (like I did in this video: PanSon – Dave Gerhart). Use a tripod. Upload the highest quality video possible. Forget all of the iMovie transitions/titles at the beginning of the video. These videos are not just for your Mom; you want everyone to watch it. 3. Respond to every comment This is a common courtesy. I make it a point to respond to every comment, whether they are good or bad. This shows that you have pride in the video you are posting and also make a personal connection with the viewers. If you are responding to a negative comment, politely ask the viewer why they thought the video was bad. This is a learning experience for everyone. If the comments are unkind or abusive, you can always report the comment to YouTube and remove it from the comment section. (Don’t do this often.) Please check out Chris’s post for more great tips. Click here for the “Top 5 Tips for Effective Music Video Promotion on YouTube” and to download CD Baby’s Ultimate YouTube Guide for Musicians for free! What tips do you have about promoting yourself on YouTube? Let me know. —– Originally posted on DrumChattr.com on October 19, 2012....
Digital CD release/marketing/distribution

Digital CD release/marketing/distribution...

On September 12, Tom Burritt and I sat down for a somewhat impromptu google+ hang out to talk about digital/CD recordings and their marketing and distribution. Take a listen to hear about how to get your recordings into iTunes, Amazon, and Google Play. And, a few other services you may not have heard about. After watching please leave your ideas/thoughts below the post. —– Originally posted on DrumChattr.com on September 13, 2012. The photo in this post is used under the Creative Commons License: Attribution – NonCommercial – No Derivs 2.0 by capslockpirate on...
John Luther Adam’s Inuksuit Resource Guide

John Luther Adam’s Inuksuit Resource Guide...

“…to act in the capacity of the human” John Luther Adams is one of the 21st Century’s most important composers. He has written a lot of extraordinary music for chamber ensembles, orchestras, solo instruments and specifically percussion ensembles. Most of his music draws inspiration from the outdoors, especially the landscapes of his home in Alaska where he has lived since 1978. Inuksuit (2009) was premiered at the Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies of Alberta and received it’s US premiere on the campus of Furman University in South Carolina. I am fortunate to be performing the West Coast premiere at the 2012 Ojai Festival under the direction of Steven Schick. Over the past couple of months, I have been building a resource guide for percussionists who will be presenting future performances of Inuksuit. This guide is in no way complete. If you know of other resources, please let me know and I will add the links and resources to the site. John Luther Adams: The Music of a True Place Inuksuit, with an introduction from composer John Luther Adams (Furman Concert) Doug Perkins Discusses the Individual Parts Thanks to Dan Savell for letting me know about these videos. Highly recommended! Player 1 Player 2 Player 3 NYC Park Avenue Armory’s Performance WQXR Interview, JLA, Douglas Perkins and Adam Sliwinski Inuksuit Tumblr Blog Program Note (From Armory Performance) My music has always been rooted in the earth. For over thirty-five years I’ve composed music inspired by the outdoors, to be heard indoors. After hearing my percussion cycle Strange and Sacred Noise performed in the Anza-Borrego desert, the New England woods, and on the tundra of the Alaska Range, I was moved to create a large-scale work conceived specifically to be performed outdoors. Inuksuit is inspired by the stone sentinels constructed over the centuries by the Inuit in the windswept expanses of the Arctic. The Inuktitut word translates literally: “to act in the capacity of the human”. This work is haunted by the vision of the melting of the polar ice, the rising of the seas, and what may remain of humanity’s presence after the waters recede. How does where we are define what we do and who we are? How do we understand the brevity of our human presence in the immensity of geologic time? What does it mean to act creatively with and within our environment? The musicians of Inuksuit are dispersed over a large area. Listeners, too, are invited to move around freely and discover their own individual listening points. There is no preferred listening point, no “best seat in the house”. Rather, every listening point is potentially the best seat. You may choose to root yourself in a central location for the entire performance, listening as the music gradually expands to fill the site. Or you may choose to wander freely, following wherever your ears may lead you, discovering musical moments and spaces that no other listener may ever hear. Inuksuit has been performed at the Banff Centre in the Canadian Rockies, on the campus of Furman University in South Carolina, and at the Round Top Festival in Texas. This performance at Park Avenue Armory, the first ever to be presented indoors, features seventy-two percussionists— fifty-four in the drill hall and eighteen in the smaller rooms on the west end of the building. Microphones located around the exterior bring the sounds of the surrounding streets into the space, turning the Armory inside out, as Inuksuit becomes part of the never-ending music of this singular city.             —John Luther Adams —– Originally posted on DrumChattr.com on June 4, 2012. The photo in this post is used under the Creative Commons License: Attribution – NonCommercial – ShareAlike...
Video Playlist of Inuksuit

Video Playlist of Inuksuit

I have created a playlist of the videos from the West Coast premiere of John Luther Adams’ Inuksuit from what has been posted on YouTube. If there are any videos I have left out, please let me know and I will add them.
Genesis Hand Pan

Genesis Hand Pan

Over the past couple of months, I have been fortunate enough to play a new instrument called the Genesis Hand Pan (aka Hang Drum). A friend of mine, David Beery, has starting making these instruments and they are absolutely beautiful instrument. Below is a video from the IronWorks Percussion Duo Concert on March 1, 2012. For more information on the Genesis Hand Pan, please visit Dave’s Island...
New Video of “Continuous Line of Evenness”

New Video of “Continuous Line of Evenness”...

It has been a busy month and I haven’t been writing much on my blog! I hope to change that in the coming month. I wanted to share the first video of my new timpani solo “Continuous Line of Evenness.” This is from my Faculty Artist Series Concert on November 1, 2011. Please leave your feedback below. Visit Bachovich Music Publications for the sheet music to this and other timpani solos. The photo in this post is courtesy of Yamaha Percussion...